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Workplace Safety Recordkeeping Essentials in the COVID-19 Era

Workplace Safety Recordkeeping Essentials in the COVID-19 Era: Virtual Live Masterclass

Product Code: YSV08122020


1st Attendee $349.00*
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Workplace Safety Recordkeeping Essentials in the COVID-19 Era: How to Comply with Newly Issued Guidance and Train Workers on Recordable/Reportable Requirements

Virtual Training: Wednesday, August 12, 2020

12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Eastern / 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Pacific


WEBINAR SNAPSHOT: Learn how to comply with OSHA recordkeeping requirements during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond.



OSHA’s injury and illness recordkeeping standards are a common pain point for many employers, and with the COVID-19 pandemic, employers have a new, and potentially troubling reality to contend with.

First is the question of whether an employee’s contraction of COVID-19 would be deemed a recordable incident. And, given that much of the U.S.-based workforce is now working remotely, employers—perhaps now more than ever—must be sure that supervisors and managers and the workforce at large understand how to communicate about injuries and illnesses stemming from work—whether those occur at a physical worksite or as employees work remotely.

Couple this with the fact that many industries’ workers are on the front lines and at high risk for contracting COVID-19: those who work for healthcare facilities, as first responders, or in essential retail, for instance.

All of these factors mean that safety and HR managers should be on high alert as to requirements concerning OSHA recordability and reporting of illnesses and injuries—whether those occur in the physical workplace or remotely.

Newly issued OSHA guidance addresses when COVID-19 related workplace exposures must be recorded and reported. But, employers are also struggling to ensure that remote employees are operating in a safe and healthful manner and understand their legal liability for injuries that occur in a work-from-home setting.

What are your obligations to record and report remote workers’ injuries, and what is the line between work-related and not work-related with the lines between work and home blurrier than ever? How can you ensure that your OSHA recordkeeping practices remain fully compliant throughout the COVID-19 crisis and beyond?

Join us for an all-new virtual training on August 12 with Attorney Adele Abrams.

Workplace Safety Recordkeeping Essentials in the COVID-19 Era will cover the latest OSHA guidance on safety recordkeeping related to COVID-19 and ensuring proper worker and supervisor training on OSHA reporting requirements when they’re working remotely.

By the end of this virtual training, you’ll understand safety recordkeeping essentials that can be applied to any injury or illness—and any situation.

Agenda

Workplace Safety Recordkeeping Essentials in the COVID-19 Era will cover the latest OSHA guidance on safety recordkeeping related to COVID-19 and ensuring proper worker and supervisor training on OSHA reporting requirements when they’re working remotely.

By the end of this virtual training, you’ll understand safety recordkeeping essentials that can be applied to any injury or illness—and any situation.

 During this intensive virtual training, you’ll learn:

  • What is recordable with respect to COVID-19 and other ailments?
  • The differences between “first aid” and “medical treatment,” how to determine whether an injury or illness is work-related, and more
  • What is immediately reportable as a Severe Injury and how to deal with completion of OSHA RRI forms
  • Best practices for completing the OSHA Forms 300, 301, and 300A and how to avoid becoming your company’s designated felon
  • Most common OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping mistakes to avoid and tips for effective root cause incident analysis to ensure accurate reporting
  • Best practices for nonmandatory records and documentation, including principles of legal privilege for safety audits, consultant recommendations, record retention, and destruction policies
  • How to train remote workers and supervisors to report and record any work-related illnesses and injuries that occur “on the clock” 
  • Documentation related to PPE assessments, medical evaluations, and exposure monitoring results


Full Agenda

12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Eastern / 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Pacific

OSHA's Part 1904 Recordkeeping and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Requirements—Including the Latest on OSHA’s Newly Released COVID-19 Guidance
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Eastern / 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Pacific

This will include the latest guidance on when a COVID-19 case is recordable, the differences between “first aid” and “medical treatment,” how to determine whether an injury or illness is work-related, exclusions, treatment of off-site injuries, medical removal cases, occupational illnesses and diseases, and more.

Recordable vs. Compensable: How Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Interacts with Workers’ Compensation
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Eastern / 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Pacific
Right now, employers are facing an unprecedented crisis. This session will cover the key differences between the underlying purpose and scope of injury/illness recordkeeping and workers’ compensation, when an injury may be recordable but not compensable and vice versa, and more—all in the context of the ongoing crisis that every workplace is dealing with right now: COVID-19.

Break
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. Eastern / 11:00 a.m.- 11:15 a.m. Pacific

Regulated Companies and Industries, Temporary Agencies and Union Hiring Halls
2:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Eastern / 11:15 a.m.- 11:45 a.m. Pacific
We’ll discuss recording and reporting requirements, exemptions for small businesses, low-hazard industries, and how OSHA recording/reporting, personal injury law, and workers’ compensation law interface with your compliance obligations concerning COVID-19 and other illnesses or workplace injuries.

How OSHA’s Severe Injury Reporting Rule Applies to the COVID-19 Crisis
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Eastern / 11:45 a.m.- 12:45 p.m. Pacific
Learn about the injuries that must be reported via phone call or online form to OSHA within a specified time frame, how OSHA prioritizes and categorizes the severe injury reports it receives, and when a severe injury report could trigger an on-site inspection or a Rapid Response Investigation (RRI)—all through an exploration of hypothetical fact patterns that relate to the types of COVID-19-related issues safety managers are struggling with right now concerning safety recordkeeping reporting.

Break
3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Eastern / 12:45 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Pacific

Best Practices for PPE Assessments, Medical Evaluations, and Exposure Monitoring Results
4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Eastern / 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Pacific

We’ll cover best practices around documentation relating to PPE assessments, medical evaluations, and exposure monitoring results, including the latest guidance from OSHA on modified respirator fit-testing in response to COVID-19.

Employee and Supervisor Training Essentials for Combatting OSHA Recordkeeping Mistakes
4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern / 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Pacific

Given the COVID-19 crisis, many businesses are having to make a tough decision: Lay off or furlough the workforce or manage a remote workforce. But, just because employees may be working remotely doesn’t mean your OSHA recordkeeping obligations go away. Now, more than ever, it’s important for organizations to train supervisors and managers, as well as their entire workforce, on how to comply with workplace safety recordkeeping requirements. This session will provide a framework to follow for proper OSHA recordkeeping training—whether you still have workers at a physical worksite or employees are distributed and working remotely due to the pandemic.

About Your Presenters

Adele AbramsAdele L. Abrams, Esq. CMSP
Firm President
Law Offices of Adele L. Abrams PC

Adele L. Abrams is an attorney and Certified Mine Safety Professional who is president of the Law Office of Adele L. Abrams P.C., a multi-attorney firm with offices in Beltsville, Maryland, Denver, Colorado, and Charleston, West Virginia. The firm represents employers in OSHA and MSHA litigation nationwide, and her firm also handles employment law matters in a large number of states. Abrams and her firm colleagues provide employment and safety law consultation, safety audits, industrial hygiene assistance, and training services to companies in a variety of industries.

She is a member of the Maryland, DC and PA Bars; the U.S. District Courts of Maryland, DC, and TN; the U.S. Court of Appeals, DC Circuit 3rd Circuit, and 4th Circuit; and the United States Supreme Court. She also serves on the adjunct faculties of the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, and the University of Colorado-Boulder, where she teaches on employment, labor and occupational safety law.

She has been a professional member of ASSE (now ASSP) since 1997 and has been a SPY award recipient at the practice specialty, chapter, and regional level multiple times. She is an active member of the National Safety Council, where she was awarded the Distinguished Service to Safety Award (DSSA) in 2017. Abrams has co-authored several textbooks on employment law, occupational and mine safety and health, and is a regular columnist on safety law issues for multiple magazines.