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OSHA Recordkeeping for Workers’ Comp: The Difference Between Recordable and Compensable Injuries and How to Manage Claims

OSHA Recordkeeping for Workers’ Comp: The Difference Between Recordable and Compensable Injuries and How to Manage Claims

Product Code: YSWA112219A

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OSHA Recordkeeping for Workers’ Comp: The Difference Between Recordable and Compensable Injuries and How to Manage Claims

Live Webinar: Friday, November 22, 2019

1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern / 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Pacific


WEBINAR SNAPSHOT: Learn how to avoid workers’ compensation-related OSHA recordkeeping compliance pitfalls.


 

Injury and illness recordkeeping is a perennial pain point for safety professionals. Workers’ compensation is an additional complication—the overlap between injuries and illnesses that are recordable under OSHA regulations and those that are compensable under state-specific workers’ comp rules is not exact, and this often creates confusion.

There are differences between workers’ compensation and OSHA recordkeeping and reporting. Many employers erroneously believe they are nearly identical.  This is most often not the case. Your workers’ compensation insurer has specific requirements with respect to the information necessary to process a claim.  Similarly, OSHA has very specific requirements regarding when to record and report, and the information that must be reported.  Although, OSHA permits an employer to substitute for an OSHA 301 Form a form that contains the same information as the OSHA 301 Form requires, employers must utilize the OSHA 300 and 300A Forms.  The presentation will cover common mistakes and how to avoid them to ensure compliance with applicable rules, regulations and contractual obligations.

Join us on November 22 for an in-depth webinar with Tracy Moon of Fisher Phillips, a skilled OSHA and labor and employment attorney, who will explain the pitfalls to avoid at the intersection of workers’ compensation and OSHA recordkeeping compliance.

You’ll learn how to:

  • Identify the situations where an injury may be recordable but not compensable, or vice versa
  • Determine when an injury covered by workers’ compensation insurance is recordable on your OSHA 300 log
  • Navigate recordkeeping for an injury covered by worker’s compensation insurance where the injured employee is terminated for violation of a company safety policy
  • Determine when to record employee injuries that occur during off-site work-related meetings and events on your OSHA 300 log
  • Properly manage OSHA 300 recordkeeping for injuries to contractors and temporary workers

About Your Presenter

Tracy MoonTracy Moon, Esq.
Partner
Fisher Phillips

Tracy Moon, a partner in Fisher Phillips’ Atlanta office, represents employers in all aspects of labor and employment law. His experience includes representation of employers before state and federal trial and appellate courts in matters under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and a variety of state law wrongful discharge, contract and tort claims.

Moon also represents employers before the National Labor Relations Board and other government agencies, including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Moon counsels and trains employers on labor and employment law, including conducting on-site compliance inspections and in-house management training programs. He is a frequent speaker at various employment and labor law programs.