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Form I-9 Recordkeeping: How to Complete, Re-Verify, Store, and Destroy Paper and Electronic Files in Compliance with Federal Law - On-Demand

Form I-9 Recordkeeping: How to Complete, Re-Verify, Store, & Destroy Files in Compliance with Federal Law - On-Demand

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Form I-9 Recordkeeping: How to Complete, Re-Verify, Store, & Destroy Files in Compliance with Federal Law - On-Demand

Webinar now available On-Demand.


WEBINAR SNAPSHOT: Learn step-by-step how to complete Form I-9 and how to re-verify, store, and destroy paper and electronic files, in compliance with federal law.


Since employers must have a valid Form I-9 on file for nearly every employee, you might think that filling out, storing, and properly destroying I-9s would become second nature. However, the process involves many potential areas of confusion for even the most seasoned HR professionals, including:

  • How to verify documents for remote employees
  • What to do when you suspect an employee’s documentation is invalid (or, even worse, clearly fraudulent)
  • How to handle SSN inconsistencies
  • The proper way to correct mistakes on I-9s
  • How long to retain I-9s
  • Re-verification
  • When and whether electronic signatures are valid


Since the Trump Administration is strongly focused on immigration enforcement, the chances of your organization being audited (or raided) by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are higher than ever.

Due to this focus, more employers are taking the opportunity to conduct proactive documentation audits of their I-9s and supporting records. Employers are also more eager to learn about, and participate in, the federal E-Verify program, asking how—and whether—this program can assist with good faith immigration compliance.

Use this on-demand webinar where two seasoned immigration attorneys, Attorney Jacob Monty of Monty & Ramirez, LLP and Attorney Elaine Young of Kirton McConkie, will provide insight on these matters, helping you ensure compliance and avoid hefty fines and enforcement actions from ICE. This all-new live webinar will feature a Q&A format designed to help you get your Form I-9 procedures and recordkeeping in order.

You’ll learn:

  • How the current Form I-9 differs from past versions
  • The benefits of registering with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new E-verify.gov website
  • Best practices for filling out the Form I-9 and legally acceptable ways to verify employee documentation
  • How to benefit from the error-checking feature of the smart Form I-9
  • Answers to common, but tricky, Form I-9 questions, such as:
    • Is an out of state driver’s license that says “Not valid for federal ID purposes” an acceptable List B document?
    • Can you accept a temporary green card? What if it’s about to expire?
    • What do you do when a proffered document just looks kind of “off” to you?
    • Is it acceptable to look at remote hires’ documents via Skype or FaceTime, or have them scanned over?
  • Form I-9 re-verification requirements for non-U.S. citizens and non-permanent residents
  • How to complete a Form I-9 for new employees using automatically extended employment authorization documents (EADs)
  • Best practices for copying and storing Forms I-9, from supporting documentation to paper Forms I-9 and electronic records
  • How to comply with the Form I-9 retention period and when it’s safe to destroy a Form I-9
  • Which recordkeeping errors attract U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s scrutiny and hefty fines
  • And much more!

About Your Presenter

Jacob MontyJacob Monty, Esq.
Founding and Managing Partner
Monty & Ramirez LLP

Jacob M. Monty is the founding and managing partner of Monty & Ramirez LLP and is Board Certified in Labor and Employment by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. His distinguished career involves the representation of employers in litigation matters in Texas and California and his expertise in handling labor issues in Hispanic workforces. He represents employers in federal and state courts in civil cases and in investigations and audits conducted by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), Department of Labor (DOL), Department of Homeland Security-Citizenship and Immigration Service (DHS-CIS), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). In these cases, Mr. Monty specializes in employee allegations of wage and hour violations, invasion of privacy, wrongful discharge and discrimination based on age, race, sex, national origin, disability, and other protected classes, as well as traditional labor matters including collective bargaining agreements and executive employment contracts.

Mr. Monty also advises clients on all aspects of immigration compliance by providing counsel on Form I-9 issues, the use of E-verify, identity theft indicators, and changes in the law regarding federal and state identification documentation. His broad industry experience extends to clients in the restaurant, manufacturing, health, retail, food and entertainment industries, private and public education systems, and government entities. He also offers a comprehensive selection of manager training courses and is an editor of the Texas Employment Law Letter.

 

Elaine YoungElaine Young, Esq.
International Practice Group Chair
Kirton McConkie

Elaine Young currently serves as International practice group chair at Kirton McConkie. She manages U.S. work visa processes for the firm’s clients, including large multinationals, small businesses, public entities, and individual investors. Her practice also includes worksite compliance, unique payroll tax issues that employers face when transferring employees across borders, and helping employers secure long-term work visas for their expatriate employees abroad. Ms. Young writes the immigration columns for the Federal Employment Law Newsletter and Utah Employment Law Newsletter, and edits the Immigration chapter of BLR’s HR Guide to Employment Law. She earned her J.D. from New York University School of Law, and then practiced in the U.S. tax group of a global firm in New York before joining Kirton McConkie in 2004.

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