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Connecticut’s New Paid Leave Law Taking Effect: The Major Impact This New Law Will Have on Workplaces Operating in the State - On-Demand

Connecticut’s New Paid Leave Law Taking Effect: The Major Impact This New Law Will Have on Workplaces Operating in the State - On-Demand

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Connecticut’s New Paid Leave Law Taking Effect: The Major Impact This New Law Will Have on Workplaces Operating in the State - On-Demand

Webinar now available On-Demand.


WEBINAR SNAPSHOT: Learn why Connecticut’s newly passed paid family leave act is a “game-changer” and how to ensure that your policies and practices in granting paid time off don’t run afoul to the new law. 


 

Connecticut’s newly enacted paid leave law is going into effect in January 2022, with employee deductions beginning in 2021, but employers will need time to prepare because this legislation is a really big deal: It applies to all private sector employers regardless of size.

Billed as one of the most generous paid leave laws in the nation, this bill, which Gov. Ned Lamont signed into law in June, signifies Connecticut joining the ranks of six other states (plus the District of Columbia) that mandate paid family and medical leave due to employees’ and their family members’ medical conditions.

Use this on-demand webinar on how to ensure that your family and medical leave practices are in compliance with new legal obligations to provide paid time off to employees in Connecticut. Our presenters, both skilled Connecticut-based labor and employment attorneys, will explain why this trend-setting legislation is such as big deal and how to properly prepare for when it takes effect.

You’ll learn:

  • The sweeping paid family leave protections Connecticut’s newly enacted law provides
  • When an employee will be entitled to paid time off due to his or her own or a family member’s medical condition
  • How much paid time off employees will be entitled to
  • How the new paid family leave law interacts with the existing Connecticut Family and Medical Leave Act (CFMLA)
  • The additional leave benefits pregnant employees may be entitled to under the new law
  • What you may and may not request in support of a request for paid family leave
  • When the law takes effect and the checklist of policy- and procedure-related practices to set into motion ahead of the new law’s effective date
  • How Connecticut’s new paid family leave law stacks up against legislation already in place in other jurisdictions, including California, D.C., Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Washington—and why this new law is considered one of the most generous paid leave laws nationwide

And much more, including live Q&A!

About Your Presenters

Jonathan SterlingJonathan Sterling, Esq.
Shareholder
Carlton Fields

Jonathan Sterling, a shareholder with Carlton Fields, defends employers against claims by current and former employees, including claims of wrongful discharge, unpaid wages, and harassment. He appreciates that employment disputes often feel personal, and his goal is to relieve employers of both the legal and the emotional burden they face. His clients include schools, colleges, businesses, municipalities, and other organizations, as well as individuals who have been sued in employment-related litigation.

In court nearly every week, Sterling defends employers in cases involving FLSA, FMLA, ERISA, freedom of expression, workers’ compensation retaliation, and common law claims. He has obtained numerous dismissals of lawsuits, as well as of administrative complaints filed with the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO). Jon routinely defends employers in CHRO and EEOC investigations and has successfully litigated against the CHRO in Superior Court.

Sterling also provides proactive advice to help employers stay compliant with employment laws and avoid litigation. Each day, he assists employers with practical matters, including reviewing and drafting employee handbooks, employment agreements, noncompete agreements, and arbitration agreements, and advises them on a variety of issues, such as terminations, investigations, reductions in force, and wage and hour issues, and in developing areas like biometrics and medical marijuana. Jon also conducts management, sexual harassment, and other training for employers.

Sterling also assists education clients with a variety of matters unique to their industry, including academic and student discipline issues. He routinely counsels educational clients on a wide variety of student, employment, and academic matters, from Title IX to bullying to vaping on campus. For example, in recent years, he has obtained judgments following trial for a university on claims brought by former students alleging hazing and alleged failure to pay an athletic scholarship.

Sterling has a significant litigation practice outside of the employment and education arena as well. He has represented clients in a number of industries in cases involving contractual, negligence, and other disputes in state and federal court, including class actions.

Sterling belongs to the Employers Counsel Network and is an editor and frequent contributor to the Connecticut Employment Law Letter and 50 Employment Laws in 50 States. He serves as a co-author of the ERISA Litigation Handbook.

Brendan GooleyBrendan N. Gooley, Esq.
Associate 
Carlton Fields

Brendan Gooley
, an associate with Carlton Fields, is a litigator who focuses on employment discrimination, education, and insurance matters. He joined the firm after clerking for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Brendan Gooley, an associate with Carlton Fields, is a litigator who focuses on employment discrimination, education, and insurance matters. He joined the firm after clerking for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Gooley defends employers, including municipalities and educational institutions, accused of various types of employment discrimination in all stages of litigation, including pre-suit, before the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO), and after actions are filed. He handles complaints alleging violations of Title VII and the ADEA, as well as the state law counterparts to those and similar statutes. He handled appeals in many employment discrimination matters during his clerkship with the Second Circuit. He also has experience conducting investigations into employment-related matters. His practice includes counseling employers in crafting various employment policies and handbooks. He is a frequent contributor to the Connecticut Employment Law Letter, writing articles on topical issues facing Connecticut employers.