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California: OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Master Class

California: OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Master Class

Product Code: SCA10142020


1st Attendee $549.00*
Additional Attendee(s)
Save $100.00$449.00 each

Total:
$549.00
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For questions or group discounting, please contact our sales team at EventSales@BLR.com or call 800-274-6774 ext. 8996.

California: OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Master Class

On Site Seminar:
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 | San Diego, CA

OSHA’s injury and illness recordkeeping standards are a common pain point for many employers. From determining which injuries and illnesses must be recorded to maintaining and updating records properly to adhering to posting and notification obligations, the rule encompasses a number of complex requirements that many organizations struggle to manage. And with the new electronic recordkeeping requirements that took effect in 2017, the stakes for noncompliance are now higher than ever, as OSHA will have access to a vast amount of establishment-specific data that the agency can use to target enforcement efforts.

This intensive 1-day master class will cover:

  • The purpose and overview of OSHA's Recordkeeping and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses rule (29 CFR 1904), including the latest on implementation of the Electronic Recordkeeping rule
  • The antiretaliation provisions of the e-Recordkeeping Rule and their practical impact on reporting procedures, incentive and discipline programs, worker drug testing, and Section 11(c) rights
  • Recent changes to OSHA’s “continuing violation” rule and pending legislation to amend the OSH Act with respect to enforcement of recordkeeping rules
  • Regulated companies and industries, temporary agencies, and union hiring halls: understanding the recordkeeping and reporting requirements that apply to each type of entity, the limited exemptions for small businesses, low-hazard industries, how OSHA recordkeeping and workers’ compensation laws interface, and more
  • What is recordable? The differences between “first aid” and “medical treatment,” how to determine whether an injury or illness is work-related, and more
  • What is immediately reportable as a Severe Injury and how to deal with completion of OSHA RRI forms
  • OSHA 300, 301, and 300A Forms: who must complete the forms, best practices for completing them correctly, and how to avoid becoming your company’s designated felon
  • Most common OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping mistakes to avoid and tips for effective root cause incident analysis to ensure accurate reporting
  • Best practices for nonmandatory records and documentation, including principles of legal privilege for safety audits, consultant recommendations, record retention, and destruction policies

Agenda

Registration and Continental Breakfast
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Overview and Introductions
8:30 a.m.

Purpose and overview of Cal/OSHA’s Recordkeeping and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses rule (8 CCR 14300)
Learn who must keep records, what records must contain, what constitutes a recordable injury, how to distinguish between first aid and medical treatment, and more.

Break
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Similarities and Differences between Cal/OSHA and Fed OSHA’s E-Recordkeeping Rule
You’ll learn which employers have to submit data, what data must be submitted and when, potential California developments on the horizon, and how the data is used to target enforcement efforts.

The Antiretaliation Provisions under California law and Fed OSHA’s E-Recordkeeping Rule
Learn their practical impact on reporting procedures, incentive and discipline programs, post-accident drug testing, and Section 11(c) rights.

Cal/OSHA’s “Continuing Violation” Rule—and the Application of the Federal OSH Act with Respect to Enforcement of the Recordkeeping Rule
The  latest for avoiding compliance pitfalls under Cal/OSHA’s “continuing violation” rule and how to manage Cal/OSHA recordkeeping audits.

Regulated Companies and Industries, Temporary Agencies and Union Hiring Halls
Recordkeeping and reporting requirements that apply to each type of entity, the limited exemptions for small businesses, low-hazard industries, and how OSHA recordkeeping and workers’ compensation laws interface, and more.

Tricky scenarios and FAQs
Learn how to handle a variety of tricky recordkeeping scenarios, from conflicting medical opinions about an injury to recording a case where light duty is recommended but not available to situations where work-relatedness is unclear.

What’s Immediately Reportable as a Serious Injury
Learn about the recent changes to Cal/OSHA’s definition of a severe injury and the actions you need to take to report serious injuries and illnesses to Cal/OSHA.

Lunch Break (on your own)
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Cal/OSHA 300, 301 and 300A Forms—and Avoiding Criminal Penalties
Effectively manage how your records are created, signed and maintained in order to comply with the latest requirements, including who must complete the forms, best practices for completing them correctly, and how to avoid certifying inaccurate recordkeeping data.

Break
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Recordkeeping beyond Cal/OSHA 300: Best Practices and Mistakes to Avoid
Tips for effective root cause incident analysis to ensure accurate reporting related to LOTO, PPE assessment, medical evaluations and exposure monitoring results, hearing conservation programs, hazard communication, workplace inspections, and worker training.

Best Practices for Non-mandatory Records and Documentation
Principles of legal privilege for safety audits, consultant recommendations, record retention and destruction policies, under federal and state law.

Debriefing and Final Questions
3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Your California Faculty

Coming Soon!

Program Location and Date

When: Wednesday, October 14, 2020
Where: Hilton San Diego Mission Valley
901 Camino Del Rio South
San Diego, CA 92108