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First Aid or Medical Treatment? How to Ensure Proper Recording Under OSHA's Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rule - On-Demand

First Aid or Medical Treatment? Ensure Proper Recording Under OSHA's Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Rule - On-Demand

Product Code: YSWA020917D

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First Aid or Medical Treatment? How to Ensure Proper Recording Under OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rule - On-Demand

Webinar now available On-Demand.

Beginning February 2017, many employers with more than 10 employees will be required to electronically record and submit injuries or illnesses to OSHA. The expectation of these new regulations is that enforcing this provision will push employers to focus more on safety—but not knowing where to draw the line on what to record could land some organizations in hot waters.

What types of injuries are considered “recordable” under OSHA law in your organization? Use this on-demand webinar to find out. Attorney Tressi Cordaro will lead an in-depth webinar about OSHA’s new Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rule where she’ll discuss what is considered recordable and how to manage your organization’s records to remain in compliance.

You’ll learn: 

  • The requirements and penalties for OSHA’s new recordkeeping rule
  • How to distinguish between “first aid” and “medical treatment”
  • Which injuries need to be recorded and which ones are exempt
  • How to electronically submit recordable injuries or illnesses
  • Which industries are required to report and which ones are exempt

About Your Presenter:

Tressi L. CordaroTressi L. Cordaro
Partner
Jackson Lewis PC

Tressi L. Cordaro is a Partner in the Washington, D.C. Region office of Jackson Lewis PC. Ms. Cordaro advises and represents employers on occupational safety and health matters before federal and state OSHA enforcement agencies. She has advised employers faced with willful and serious citations as the result of catastrophic events and fatalities, including citations involving multi-million dollar penalties. Ms. Cordaro’s approach to representing an employer cited by OSHA is to seek an efficient resolution of contested citations, reserving litigation as the option if the client’s business objectives cannot otherwise be achieved. As a result, she has secured OSHA withdrawals of citations without the need for litigation.

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