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Employee Handbook Updates for 2018: Policy Drafting and Enforcement Tips for Staying Out of Legal Trouble - On-Demand

Employee Handbook Updates for 2018: Policy Drafting and Enforcement Tips for Staying Out of Legal Trouble - On-Demand

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Employee Handbook Updates for 2018:
Policy Drafting and Enforcement Tips for Staying Out of Legal Trouble - On-Demand

Webinar is now available on-demand.


WEBINAR SNAPSHOT: Learn how to update your employee handbook to ensure compliance with the latest federal legislation, regulations, and court rulings and avoid common drafting “traps” that could lead to legal liability for your company in 2018.



With 2018 just around the corner, now is the time to start making updates to your employee handbook to ensure compliance with any federal changes applicable to employment laws.

For starters, it’s important to keep up with the National Labor Relations Board’s position on social media policies. If the handbook outlines a policy that’s too restrictive it might not hold up in court—and that goes for things as seemingly innocuous as telling employees to maintain a positive work environment and social media presence.

There are many other red flags you need to watch for in your handbook. For instance. employers should also take a close look at policies addressing recording in the workplace, media inquiries, or disparaging the employer. Also, some states have added rules about paid leave, and it’s important to stay in compliance with those too.

It doesn’t stop there, either. Depending on which state or city your organization operates in, many employers may need to adjust their policies concerning weapons. That’s because many states now allow gun owners to at least keep their licensed firearm in their locked car in the parking lot. Handbook policies should be carefully drafted if, in an open or concealed carry state, the employer wants to avoid having an employee bring their firearm onto the premises.

Finally, there are other recent developments that have thrust other issues into the spotlight, such as whether: 

  • you can include language in the handbook that prohibits employees from discussing their salaries; 
  • you must provide the same leave to men when you have a maternity policy outlined in the employee handbook; and 
  • you may fire someone for off-duty conduct violations related to their involvement in political protests and other forms of demonstration. 


Use this on-demand webinar to get a jump on what you should update in your employee handbook ahead of the new year. Our presenter, a skilled labor and employment attorney, will provide valuable insight on recent and coming changes in the law that may affect their employee handbooks, and guidance on how to effectively prepare for 2018 updates to avoid legal missteps.

You’ll learn: 

  • How current and imminent changes in laws may impact your employee handbook in 2018 
  • How to prepare an employee handbook or review your current employee handbook carefully to determine how it needs to be updated 
  • Examples of handbook wording that could be interpreted in legally risky ways 
  • How to properly provide employees with notice, so you’re sure they understand the rights and responsibilities spelled out in the handbook 
  • Employee handbook policy-drafting mistakes that could be interpreted as hindering employees from believing they can report violations to the EEOC or another agency 
  • What your employee handbook for 2018 should contain—and the key disclaimer language to be sure to include 
  • Language that can protect your company legally, including an integrated at-will agreement 
  • How to evaluate which policies you should always include in the handbook, no matter how obvious they may seem 
  • Current tripwires to avoid concerning social media, recordings, communications, and off-duty conduct 
  • And much more! 

About Your Presenter

Michelli Rivera, Esq.Michelli Rivera, Esq. 
Associate 
Fisher Phillips, LLP 

Michelli Rivera of Fisher Phillips, LLP’s Atlanta office represents clients in all areas of labor and employment law including employment discrimination claims, wage and hour disputes and audits, Fair Credit Reporting Act claims, federal contractor compliance. She specializes in compliance, training, and prevention and has assisted clients of all sizes across various industries in reviewing and updating employee handbooks and onboarding documents.

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